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This blog is run by 14-year old girl. Who just happens to be inspired by politics and laws.
No, not the government. I, usually, post about political phenomenons, etc. So, stick around and you might just hear a small voice, waiting to be heard.
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"A man is none the less a slave because he is allowed to choose a new master once in a term of years."
- Lysander Spooner (1808-1887)

(Source: the-little-monster, via )

(Source: conorphillimore, via )

fredglozanojr:

Don’t just go with the flow. Go with what your heart says. :) #thought

fredglozanojr:

Don’t just go with the flow. Go with what your heart says. :) #thought

think-progress:

President Obama’s audience tonight.
Our audience was right over here.

think-progress:

President Obama’s audience tonight.

Our audience was right over here.

breakingnews:

US navy ship evacuated after striking reef in Philippines
NBC News: The crew of a U.S. Navy minesweeper that ran aground in a protected marine sanctuary off the Philippines was evacuated as the ship remained stuck on a reef.
Photo: A photo released on Jan. 18, 2013 by the Philippine Western Command (WESCOM) shows the US Navy minesweeper USS Guardian after it ran aground on the Tubbataha Reef in the western Philippine island of Palawan on Jan. 17. (WESCOM via AFP - Getty Images)

breakingnews:

US navy ship evacuated after striking reef in Philippines

NBC News: The crew of a U.S. Navy minesweeper that ran aground in a protected marine sanctuary off the Philippines was evacuated as the ship remained stuck on a reef.

Photo: A photo released on Jan. 18, 2013 by the Philippine Western Command (WESCOM) shows the US Navy minesweeper USS Guardian after it ran aground on the Tubbataha Reef in the western Philippine island of Palawan on Jan. 17. (WESCOM via AFP - Getty Images)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

106 people reported killed by Bashar al-Assad’s forces in Homs on Tuesday.
Dozens were killed when a blast hit Aleppo University.
Jari Lindholm on discovering a hasty mass grave in Aleppo.
A translated interview with Medecins Sans Frontières’ Fabrice Weissman on the state of hospitals in Syria.
The Syrian battle for the airports.
There are splits and infighting between the jihadists and the more secular revolutionary Free Syrian Army.
Despite a cable reported on in Foreign Policy which offered evidence that Syria had used chemical weapons in Homs in late December, a State Dept investigation is saying that evidence does not show this to be true.
Netanyahu pledged over the weekend to follow through with settlement plans in the E-1 area of the West Bank after Palestinians were evicted. 
The sentences of seven Omani bloggers convicted of insulting the king were upheld in court. 
France has intervened in Mali, conducting operations against Islamists in the north.
Militants in Algeria seized hostages, including Americans, in retribution for the French military assault on Mali. Algeria launched an assault on the militants, which freed some captives but left others dead. The fate of the individual hostages remains unknown.
The US officially recognizes Somalia’s government.
The US has continued to sell arms to Bahrain amidst its bloody crackdown on protesters.
Iraq released hundreds of prisoners, conceded to Sunni protesters.
Luke Mogelson embeds with Afghan soldiers tracking down the Taliban.
The US will no longer send detainees to certain Afghan prisons based on fears of abuses.
The US will sell Afghanistan unarmed aerial vehicles, but not, the Pentagon insists, drones of the killer variety.
India and Pakistan agree to a de-escalation in Kashmir.
Pakistani cleric/activist Tahir ul-Qadri ended his four days of protest after his party was granted input in the country’s electoral process.
A court issued an arrest order for PM Raja Pervez Ashraf, but the anti-corruption chief refused, saying there was not enough evidence.
Karman Faisal, the man investigating the graft case against PM Raja Pervez Ashraf, was found dead in Islamabad this morning.
Der Spiegel looks into corruption, mistrust of the government and a massacre in Kazakhstan.
Flag riots and sectarian violence continue to plague Northern Ireland as the loyalist/Protestant working class youth erupt.
Bombs were detonated in the homes of five Greek journalists last weekend. The responsibility was claimed by anarchist group Lovers of Lawlessness.
Teju Cole tweeted seven very short stories about drones: “Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. Pity. A signature strike leveled the florist’s.” 
Steve Coll reviews Zero Dark Thirty.
Here’s an electronic briefing book compiled by the The National Security Archive of all the available documents on Operation Neptune Spear (the mission to take down bin Laden).
There were as many as 349 military suicides in 2012 (239 confirmed, 110 under investigation). That would be the highest since 2001, when the Pentagon first started compiling detailed stats.
US special operations forces are preparing to be sent to expand the training of Mexican commando teams in the war on the drug cartels.
Sorry, no Death Star.
Former Sen. Chuck Hagel’s confirmation hearings for Sec. of Defense are set for Jan. 31.
Current Secretary of Defense Panetta says the only people who need armor-piercing bullets are the military, backing the president’s call for an assault weapons ban.
Former US Army staff sergeant Clinton Romesha will receive the Medal of Honor next month, becoming the fourth living recipient.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Azaz, Syria (north of Aleppo). A bloody Free Syrian Army fighter walked down the street after a missile attack. Muzaffar Salman/Reuters

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Azaz, Syria (north of Aleppo). A bloody Free Syrian Army fighter walked down the street after a missile attack. Muzaffar Salman/Reuters

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

politics-war:

People leave Damara, the last strategic town between the rebels from the Seleka coalition and the Central African Republic’s capital, Bangui, on Jan. 2, 2013, as the commander of the regional African force FOMAC warned rebels against trying to take the town, saying it would “amount to a declaration of war.”

politics-war:

People leave Damara, the last strategic town between the rebels from the Seleka coalition and the Central African Republic’s capital, Bangui, on Jan. 2, 2013, as the commander of the regional African force FOMAC warned rebels against trying to take the town, saying it would “amount to a declaration of war.”

(Source: artismyhustle, via politics-war)

(Source: politics-war, via politics-war)

(Source: politics-war, via politics-war)